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School Transit Education Program

Quil Ceda/Tulalip 1st Grade Winner

St. Mary Magdalan 1st Grade Winner

St. Mary Magdalan 3rd Grade Winner

Congratulations Coloring
Contest Winners

 
Recently, two schools in Snohomish County had the opportunity to participate in a School Transit EducationProgram (STEP) Coloring Contest. The winners were announced in early June at ice cream parties hosted by Community Transit's mascot Oxy Gene; Defender of Truth, Justice, And Really Clean Air!
 
About 80 1st grade students from Quil Ceda/Tulalip Elementary School on the Tulalip Reservation and 120 1st and 3rd grade students from St. Mary Magdalan in Everett submitted drawings for the contest.

The contest had two themes;


  • 1st grade-be your own superhero, help Oxy Gene fight pollution
  • 3rd grade-Community Transit; connecting people and places

First place winners' designs are being displayed as bus interior cards on 25 Community Transit buses and will remain on board all summer for everyone to see! 

Thanks to all for a job well done!

What is STEP?

Want to learn how to ride the Community Transit bus system? The School Transit Education Program will teach you everything you need to know.

STEP is an entertaining and informative presentation developed by Community Transit and shared at no cost with our neighbors in Snohomish County. The demonstration focuses on the features and benefits of public transportation.

Community Transit Education Coordinator Steve Peters introduces students from Kindergarten through 12th grade to their local transit system with easy-to-understand steps.

For the younger audience…

With imitations, characters, stories and enthusiastic imagination, Steve's 30-minute program in the classroom will keep the students laughing as they learn. Immediately following, everyone joins Steve for a half-hour bus ride on a comfortable 60-foot articulated bus. This "rolling classroom," driven by some of Community Transit's best drivers, allows students to apply their skills as new bus riders.

"It was fun, and most importantly, the kids remembered what you said. You certainly have the gift of communicating and teaching!"
Ginger K, Teacher, 2nd Grade

What will older students learn?

Students will enjoy hearing about transit's role in keeping the environment clean, and by using public transportation, how they can make a difference. They'll also discover basic bus riding principles, including locating a route number, safety, rules and much more. Following the presentation at any location, they will understand how easy it is to take the bus to their favorite destinations.

"Thanks for a thoroughly enjoyable and most informative visit…a wonderful mix of solid facts and fun-loving goofyness! And in case you didn't notice, the adults thought you were pretty amazing, too."
Pat T, Library Program Coordinator

Here's a sample of what the STEP audience will learn.
Step One:

Behave.
Community Transit buses are public; everyone can ride them. There are three main rules when you ride the bus, to make everyone's experience positive:

 

  1. Keep your hands to yourself.
  2. Be courteous and kind.
  3. Use a more quiet voice.
Step Two:

Locate the route number.
A "route" is where the bus takes you; you will need to know which route you want. Routes can take you to school, the beach, and even sporting events. Route numbers are found on the front, side, and back of the bus.

 

On the side of the road you will find Bus Stop signs. They are the same color as the bus – blue and white. Make sure the route number you've selected on the bus stop sign is the same as the route number on the bus.

Step Three:

Board the bus.
As the bus approaches the bus stop, simply wave your hand to let the driver know that you wish to board the bus.
Stand back from the bus and wait until it comes to a complete stop. The driver will open the door for you to get on. If you have a bike, you can load it on the bike rack on the front of the bus. Have your exact change ready to drop in the fare box. (In Snohomish County, fares are: $1.75 for adults, $1.25 for youth 6 to18, and free for kids 5 and under.) For safety reasons, please find a seat quickly and remember, the seats located in the front of the bus are for senior citizens and passengers with disabilities.

 

Step Four:

Ride the bus.
While riding, sit facing forward, with your legs in front of you. You can listen to music using headphones. Eating and drinking are not allowed on the bus, although beverages in spill-proof containers are permitted. If you ever have a question while you are on the bus, the driver will be happy to help you out. Please try to ask your question when it will least distract the driver. Enjoy the excellent views from the large windows on the bus, and never put your arms or head outside the window. Windows with red handles are emergency exits. During an emergency, you can open these windows by pushing the handle down and then out.

 

Step Five:

Exit the bus.
Located inside the bus, about half way up the sides, you will find the bell cord. When you are approaching your destination (about a block or two away), pull down on the bell cord. This will signal the driver that you wish to get off at the next stop. Wait for the bus to stop completely before exiting. Make sure you have everything with you before you leave. The driver will make sure you are safely off the bus before closing the doors and departing. Wait for the bus to leave the stop area before crossing the street. Never cross in front of the bus.